Media Releases

Research in the press

Pre-settlemnt coral trout larva. Credit: Colin Wen

Pre-settlemnt coral trout larva. Credit: Colin Wen

A mouth-brooding male cardinalfish. Credit: Clive Hamilton

A mouth-brooding male cardinalfish. Credit: Clive Hamilton

Surveying corals at Kenn Reef in the southern Coral Sea

Surveying corals at Kenn Reef in the southern Coral Sea

Anemone fish ( Amphiprion omanensis ) endemic to the southern Omani coast, Picture by Tane Sinclair-Taylor

Anemone fish (Amphiprion omanensis) endemic to the southern Omani coast, Picture by Tane Sinclair-Taylor

Juvenile coral trout ( Plectropomus maculatus ) - Photo: Phil Woodhead Wet Image Underwater Photography

Juvenile coral trout (Plectropomus maculatus) - Photo: Phil Woodhead Wet Image Underwater Photography

Tracking baby fish for better reef management

Tracking the lives of thousands of tiny baby fish is no easy task. But knowing where they’ll settle and spend their lives as adults is invaluable data for the fishing industry and reef managers. Using genetic parentage data we validate a biophysical model that incorporates hydrodynamics of the Great Barrier Reef with detailed behavioural characteristic of larval fish.

Read more here.

 

Cardinal fish caught sneaking on the side

The male cardinalfish remains in socially monogamous pairs and carries the eggs in his mouth until they are ready to hatch. At least that’s what we thought. On closer examination the lives of cardinalfish are marked by torrid, adulterous love lives, with cuckoldry going hand-in-hand with cannibalism.

Read more here.

 

Evidence of Coral Bleaching in the Coral Sea

During the course of a recent 30-day expedition throughout the southern and central Coral Sea, I observed first hand the impact of past storms and cyclones, and recorded the devastating impact of the 2015/16 bleaching events that affected 40% to 80% of corals in the central Coral Sea.

 

Read more here.

 

Expedition Finds Nemo can Travel Hundreds of Kilometres to Connect Populations

Anemone fish spend their entire lives nestles in their host anemones. However, as babies, that can undertake epic journeys, sometimes up to 400 km from where they were born. 

 

Read more here.

 

Marine Reserves Provide Baby Bonus to Fisheries

No-take marine reserves (Green zones) in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park are generating a huge proportion of juvenile fish for local fisheries. Reserves are a good reason why there are plenty more fish in the sea,

 

Read more here.